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800,000 factory jobs were lost to Chinese imports, but the U.S. is better off, researchers say
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ltlee1
2017-05-17 22:02:19 UTC
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http://www.marketwatch.com/story/800000-factory-jobs-were-lost-to-chinese-imports-but-the-us-is-better-off-researchers-say-2017-05-16
-----------------
marketwatch.com
800,000 factory jobs were lost to Chinese imports, but the U.S. is better off, researchers say
Andrea Riquier
2-3 minutes

In a time of increased tension over trade and globalization, a research paper from a trio of St. Louis Fed economists is a reminder that the impact of trade patterns on the economy isn’t always straightforward.

The amount of goods America imported from China more than doubled between 2000 and 2007, wrote Lorenzo Caliendo, Maximiliano Dvorkin, and Fernando Parro, even as manufacturing employment tumbled.

While sectors of the economy that are highly exposed to import competition from China lost more manufacturing jobs than those with less exposure, the overall impact to the economy was more mixed. About half the lost jobs — 800,000 — can be directly attributed to the “China shock,” the authors wrote.

But those lost jobs may be somewhat offset by other factors, such as access to cheaper goods. Overall U.S. “welfare” increased 0.6%, the authors wrote. That translates to an average gain of $260 in extra spending for every American consumer for each year for the rest of their lives thanks to more, cheaper, Chinese imports.

Meanwhile, those sectors of the economy that were insulated from Chinese competition also profited from access to cheaper input materials from China.

In all, the authors found, manufacturing job losses were offset by gains of “a similar number” of jobs in services, construction, and wholesale and retail trade.
...
--------------
rst9
2017-05-18 01:48:05 UTC
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Post by ltlee1
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/800000-factory-jobs-were-lost-to-chinese-imports-but-the-us-is-better-off-researchers-say-2017-05-16
-----------------
marketwatch.com
800,000 factory jobs were lost to Chinese imports, but the U.S. is better off, researchers say
Andrea Riquier
2-3 minutes
In a time of increased tension over trade and globalization, a research paper from a trio of St. Louis Fed economists is a reminder that the impact of trade patterns on the economy isn’t always straightforward.
The amount of goods America imported from China more than doubled between 2000 and 2007, wrote Lorenzo Caliendo, Maximiliano Dvorkin, and Fernando Parro, even as manufacturing employment tumbled.
While sectors of the economy that are highly exposed to import competition from China lost more manufacturing jobs than those with less exposure, the overall impact to the economy was more mixed. About half the lost jobs — 800,000 — can be directly attributed to the “China shock,” the authors wrote.
But those lost jobs may be somewhat offset by other factors, such as access to cheaper goods. Overall U.S. “welfare” increased 0.6%, the authors wrote. That translates to an average gain of $260 in extra spending for every American consumer for each year for the rest of their lives thanks to more, cheaper, Chinese imports.
Meanwhile, those sectors of the economy that were insulated from Chinese competition also profited from access to cheaper input materials from China.
In all, the authors found, manufacturing job losses were offset by gains of “a similar number” of jobs in services, construction, and wholesale and retail trade.
...
--------------
Don't blame China. Blame American companies and their management.

Ford planning to lay off 20,000 workers in North America, Asia
by Anna Giaritelli | May 15, 2017, 11:14 PM

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/ford-planning-to-lay-off-20000-workers-in-north-america-asia/article/2623180
s***@gmail.com
2017-05-18 15:50:44 UTC
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Post by rst9
Don't blame China. Blame American companies and their management.
Ford planning to lay off 20,000 workers in North America, Asia
by Anna Giaritelli | May 15, 2017, 11:14 PM
http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/ford-planning-to-lay-off-20000-workers-in-north-america-asia/article/2623180
Yale Guen Mar, wasn't your first wife from North Korea? Would she be siding with dictator Kim Jong-un? Did you always support Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-il?

Yale Guen Mar has a very soft corner for North Korea.

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/soc.culture.china/kB_iOgpuHPE
Post by rst9
I had a wonderful and successful life in the U.S., wonderful children and grandchildren.
I have always taken the communist side of any debate, any discussion. It's my nature. This fact is in my file when I was interviewed for security clearance.
My first wife's family was a land-owning class of North Korea when the Japanese invaded Korea. Her family and her group moved to China to fight against the Japanese. Her father was a graduate of Whampao Military Academy in China and an officer of the Nationalist Chinese Army during WWII. She was born in Chungking, the wartime capital of China.
After WWII ended, the Korean faction of the Chinese Army went back to Korea. She was driven by military escort and guards everywhere they go. Synman Rhee had the opposition party leaders killed because he had U.S. support. Her father was killed and the body was never found.
My first wife was very anti-communist. On any discussion on communism, I always had to take the communist side as I am currently doing in soc.culture.china.
Yale Guen Mar, you know which side of the bread is buttered. You know enough of the life under the North Korean regime not to relocate there or even to the land of your birth to live under CCP dictatorship.

Yale Guen Mar, you are not rst0wxyz, rst2wxyz, rst4wxyz, rst7wxyz or rst9wxyz
.
You are Yale Guen Mar (born 1st February, 1938 in mainland China) who lives on 3851 Twilight Avenue in Merced, California.

No subterfuge will erase the fact that you have been using aliases not just to to hide your troubled past but to act a Qusiling to USA where you have resided since 1949.

Shame on you. No wonder you were thrown out by May Fung and Yuhua Luo.

Even your live-in-nurse-cum-maid Meichi Thai detests you.

You have become the object of scorn of your Hmong neighbors on Twilight Avenue.


Your tombstone can only read:


Lies here the man with soul so dead,
Who never to himself hath said,
'This is my own, my native land!'
ltlee1
2017-05-21 14:54:46 UTC
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Post by ltlee1
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/800000-factory-jobs-were-lost-to-chinese-imports-but-the-us-is-better-off-researchers-say-2017-05-16
-----------------
marketwatch.com
800,000 factory jobs were lost to Chinese imports, but the U.S. is better off, researchers say
Andrea Riquier
2-3 minutes
In a time of increased tension over trade and globalization, a research paper from a trio of St. Louis Fed economists is a reminder that the impact of trade patterns on the economy isn’t always straightforward.
The amount of goods America imported from China more than doubled between 2000 and 2007, wrote Lorenzo Caliendo, Maximiliano Dvorkin, and Fernando Parro, even as manufacturing employment tumbled.
While sectors of the economy that are highly exposed to import competition from China lost more manufacturing jobs than those with less exposure, the overall impact to the economy was more mixed. About half the lost jobs — 800,000 — can be directly attributed to the “China shock,” the authors wrote.
But those lost jobs may be somewhat offset by other factors, such as access to cheaper goods. Overall U.S. “welfare” increased 0.6%, the authors wrote. That translates to an average gain of $260 in extra spending for every American consumer for each year for the rest of their lives thanks to more, cheaper, Chinese imports.
Meanwhile, those sectors of the economy that were insulated from Chinese competition also profited from access to cheaper input materials from China.
In all, the authors found, manufacturing job losses were offset by gains of “a similar number” of jobs in services, construction, and wholesale and retail trade.
...
--------------
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-fed-williams-idUSKCN18F28E

"Fed's Williams: U.S. economic future in services, not manufacturing

San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank President John Williams on Friday told a group of high school students that the future of the U.S. economy is in services, not in manufacturing.
"Right now the U.S. economy is doing OK," Williams said at El Camino High School in South San Francisco, citing the U.S. unemployment rate at 4.4 percent.
For future growth, he said, the economy will rely increasingly on services, not manufacturing. "There's this idea that somehow we got to get the jobs back to manufacturing," he said, adding that work in services like healthcare and education is where U.S. workers excel.

(Reporting by Ann Saphir)"
rst9
2017-05-21 15:57:09 UTC
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Post by ltlee1
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-fed-williams-idUSKCN18F28E
"Fed's Williams: U.S. economic future in services, not manufacturing
That will be the downfall of America!!! Paper pushers can not hold up power to control the world. Manufacturing can!!!
Post by ltlee1
San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank President John Williams on Friday told a group of high school students that the future of the U.S. economy is in services, not in manufacturing.
"Right now the U.S. economy is doing OK," Williams said at El Camino High School in South San Francisco, citing the U.S. unemployment rate at 4.4 percent.
For future growth, he said, the economy will rely increasingly on services, not manufacturing. "There's this idea that somehow we got to get the jobs back to manufacturing," he said, adding that work in services like healthcare and education is where U.S. workers excel.
(Reporting by Ann Saphir)"
s***@gmail.com
2017-05-21 16:18:08 UTC
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Post by rst9
Post by ltlee1
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-fed-williams-idUSKCN18F28E
"Fed's Williams: U.S. economic future in services, not manufacturing
That will be the downfall of America!!! Paper pushers can not hold up power to control the world. Manufacturing can!!!
Yale Guen Mar, you need to stop pushing gas and shit through your asshole in public places and grocery stores.

Yale Guen Mar, you have never shied away from farting while inside local grocery stores like Merced Community Food Market, Yue Cheng Market and Rancho San Miguel or visiting them in soiled leaky diapers. But will Yale Guen Mar be happy if the Lees and the Miaos and members of the Lopez family take to visiting 3851 Twilight Avenue to return the "compliment" ?

Yale Guen Mar, if you think you can get away after farting by pointing fingers at others inside the Hmong grocery store, you'll comntinue to point fingers at others.

But if your diaper is leaking solid, liquid and gas continuously, it won't take the Lees too much time to realize that you are the one responsible for the stink bomb.

Yale Guen Mar, isn't it a shame that you are single-handedly turning the Twilight Avenue neighborhood in Merced, CA into a dirty filthy place?

Yale Guen Mar, must you remain hygienically challenged? Can'y you ask Meichi Thai to change your diaper before you visit the household of Mr. Ravinder Singh, or the Lees' grocery store or the taro patches of your Hmong neighbors?

Ravinder Singh isn't laughing. Yale Guen Mar's diaper leaks - it leaves stinking stains on Ravinder's sofa.

Yale Guen Mar was really depressed after his futile letter to Quincy, MA begging for money. Yale Guen Mar now comes to Ravinder's house quite often to cry his heart out - but he sheds more than tears. Yale Guen Mar's diaper invariably leaks leaving yellow stains on Ravinder's sofa.

Yale Guen Mar, be more considerate. Ask Meichi Thai to change your diaper before you pay a visit to Ravinder's house.

Yale Guen Mar, don't be gross while shopping at the Hmong grocery store. Step outside to fart instead of stinking up the grocery store. You are driving away customers.

Yale Guen Mar, why don't you ask your caregiver Meichi Thai to insert a cork inside your shit-hole before visiting your Hmong grocer? You have been farting inside the grocery store incessantly every time you go their shopping. The stink drives away other shoppers.

Yale Guen Mar, you are being grossly unfair to your Hmong grocer by indulging in gross farting inside the grocery store. Either step outside the store to fart or have Maichi Thai insert a cork in your anus before you go for your grocery shopping.

Yale Guen Mar, you have been a bad neighbor. Why have you been shitting on the taro patch of one of your Hmong neighbors? Not satisfied with molesting the Hmong-owned pigs, you have now take to fertilizing their taro patches !!
Post by rst9
Post by ltlee1
On the surface, he acts tough with Kim (a kind of wayang like Hollywood)... but underneath, he is not for regime change or doing the impossible thing.
On the contary, America's position IS regime change, AND doing the "impossible things".
Yale Guen Mar, hasn't Uncle Chang been busy making territorial claims not just on all neighboring countries but on neighboring seas and oceans as well?

Yale Guen Mar, how about the skirmishes you have had with the Lees of Merced Community Food Market and with Mr. Miao of Yue Cheng Market?

Have you learnt your lesson?

Or do you still harbor the wish to torment them with your stinky deeds inside Merced Community Food Market and Yue Cheng Market?

Remember how an enraged Ms. Lee had sodomized you with an opo squash after your latest trnsgression at the Merced Community Food Market?

And Mr. Miao is hopping mad. He might sodomize you with a bitter melon. And that will surely leave a better taste inside your asshole.
Post by rst9
Post by ltlee1
San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank President John Williams on Friday told a group of high school students that the future of the U.S. economy is in services, not in manufacturing.
"Right now the U.S. economy is doing OK," Williams said at El Camino High School in South San Francisco, citing the U.S. unemployment rate at 4.4 percent.
For future growth, he said, the economy will rely increasingly on services, not manufacturing. "There's this idea that somehow we got to get the jobs back to manufacturing," he said, adding that work in services like healthcare and education is where U.S. workers excel.
(Reporting by Ann Saphir)"
sukiki
2017-05-26 02:08:40 UTC
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This way of comparison is not healthy for the economy of the country.
Manufacturing contributes to the education of the people too. People learn
and horn their skills from their books they had learned. A look at the
Japanese is good enough to show that manufacturing gradually grows
increasingly in leaps and bounds from looking at the performance of the
actual product made and sold. In fact America has lost so much of their
manufacturing in the past 30 years can be shown by how much Japan and China
had moved ahead in their respective paces.



"ltlee1" wrote in message news:1dec4752-55b7-49ee-9e0e-***@googlegroups.com...

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/800000-factory-jobs-were-lost-to-chinese-imports-but-the-us-is-better-off-researchers-say-2017-05-16
-----------------
marketwatch.com
800,000 factory jobs were lost to Chinese imports, but the U.S. is better
off, researchers say
Andrea Riquier
2-3 minutes

In a time of increased tension over trade and globalization, a research
paper from a trio of St. Louis Fed economists is a reminder that the impact
of trade patterns on the economy isn’t always straightforward.

The amount of goods America imported from China more than doubled between
2000 and 2007, wrote Lorenzo Caliendo, Maximiliano Dvorkin, and Fernando
Parro, even as manufacturing employment tumbled.

While sectors of the economy that are highly exposed to import competition
from China lost more manufacturing jobs than those with less exposure, the
overall impact to the economy was more mixed. About half the lost jobs —
800,000 — can be directly attributed to the “China shock,” the authors
wrote.

But those lost jobs may be somewhat offset by other factors, such as access
to cheaper goods. Overall U.S. “welfare” increased 0.6%, the authors
wrote. That translates to an average gain of $260 in extra spending for
every American consumer for each year for the rest of their lives thanks to
more, cheaper, Chinese imports.

Meanwhile, those sectors of the economy that were insulated from Chinese
competition also profited from access to cheaper input materials from China.

In all, the authors found, manufacturing job losses were offset by gains of
“a similar number” of jobs in services, construction, and wholesale and
retail trade.
...
--------------

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
ltlee1
2017-05-26 22:38:45 UTC
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Post by sukiki
This way of comparison is not healthy for the economy of the country.
Manufacturing contributes to the education of the people too. People learn
and horn their skills from their books they had learned. A look at the
Japanese is good enough to show that manufacturing gradually grows
increasingly in leaps and bounds from looking at the performance of the
actual product made and sold. In fact America has lost so much of their
manufacturing in the past 30 years can be shown by how much Japan and China
had moved ahead in their respective paces.
I don't think manufacturing job and service job are inherently different in the sense that manufacturing makes better people out of workers.

Post by sukiki
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/800000-factory-jobs-were-lost-to-chinese-imports-but-the-us-is-better-off-researchers-say-2017-05-16
-----------------
marketwatch.com
800,000 factory jobs were lost to Chinese imports, but the U.S. is better
off, researchers say
Andrea Riquier
2-3 minutes
In a time of increased tension over trade and globalization, a research
paper from a trio of St. Louis Fed economists is a reminder that the impact
of trade patterns on the economy isn’t always straightforward.
The amount of goods America imported from China more than doubled between
2000 and 2007, wrote Lorenzo Caliendo, Maximiliano Dvorkin, and Fernando
Parro, even as manufacturing employment tumbled.
While sectors of the economy that are highly exposed to import competition
from China lost more manufacturing jobs than those with less exposure, the
overall impact to the economy was more mixed. About half the lost jobs —
800,000 — can be directly attributed to the “China shock,” the authors
wrote.
But those lost jobs may be somewhat offset by other factors, such as access
to cheaper goods. Overall U.S. “welfare” increased 0.6%, the authors
wrote. That translates to an average gain of $260 in extra spending for
every American consumer for each year for the rest of their lives thanks to
more, cheaper, Chinese imports.
Meanwhile, those sectors of the economy that were insulated from Chinese
competition also profited from access to cheaper input materials from China.
In all, the authors found, manufacturing job losses were offset by gains of
“a similar number” of jobs in services, construction, and wholesale and
retail trade.
...
--------------
---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
sukiki
2017-05-27 03:09:24 UTC
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The story in link is the early days of manufacturing of products where human
works with their hands is the labor of production. Hand-on is the labor of
gaining of experience and the knowledge of knowing it. But in modern days,
automation increases more output with less labor production to increase
productivity.

Later, labor of production is then expanded into services what is now of
modern days of IT, technology areas like design, research, development,
processes, and material that were small parts of the areas of the
manufacturing processes of the products.

These were actually services of production or production services to support
the production and manufacturing. They were small parts of service areas in
the labor of production at that early days. However, these services gained
foothold to leap ahead to provide for and to support the set up of a
flexible manufacturing processes.

The manufacturing experiences gained from by the labor of production became
a source of experiences for companies to understand and understood better of
their insights of how their products can be improved or how their
manufacturing processes can reduce unit cost of labor production and other
aspects of production services.

All these manufacturing worked and gained that used in the expansion of
services are one of the requisites and recipes of services. They are the
adaptors of changes. Without hand-on working,, horning, knowing and
experience of it, service is nothing, so to speak. Service alone will not
produce anything without manufacturing.
Post by sukiki
This way of comparison is not healthy for the economy of the country.
Manufacturing contributes to the education of the people too. People learn
and horn their skills from their books they had learned. A look at the
Japanese is good enough to show that manufacturing gradually groay to nws
increasingly in leaps and bounds from looking at the performance of the
actual product made and sold. In fact America has lost so much of their
manufacturing in the past 30 years can be shown by how much Japan and China
had moved ahead in their respective paces.
I don't think manufacturing job and service job are inherently different in
the sense that manufacturing makes better people out of workers.
http://youtu.be/DfGs2Y5WJ14
Post by sukiki
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/800000-factory-jobs-were-lost-to-chinese-imports-but-the-us-is-better-off-researchers-say-2017-05-16
-----------------
marketwatch.com
800,000 factory jobs were lost to Chinese imports, but the U.S. is better
off, researchers say
Andrea Riquier
2-3 minutes
In a time of increased tension over trade and globalization, a research
paper from a trio of St. Louis Fed economists is a reminder that the impact
of trade patterns on the economy isn’t always straightforward.
The amount of goods America imported from China more than doubled between
2000 and 2007, wrote Lorenzo Caliendo, Maximiliano Dvorkin, and Fernando
Parro, even as manufacturing employment tumbled.
While sectors of the economy that are highly exposed to import competition
from China lost more manufacturing jobs than those with less exposure, the
overall impact to the economy was more mixed. About half the lost jobs —
800,000 — can be directly attributed to the “China shock,” the authors
wrote.
But those lost jobs may be somewhat offset by other factors, such as access
to cheaper goods. Overall U.S. “welfare” increased 0.6%, the authors
wrote. That translates to an average gain of $260 in extra spending for
every American consumer for each year for the rest of their lives thanks to
more, cheaper, Chinese imports.
Meanwhile, those sectors of the economy that were insulated from Chinese
competition also profited from access to cheaper input materials from China.
In all, the authors found, manufacturing job losses were offset by gains of
“a similar number” of jobs in services, construction, and wholesale and
retail trade.
...
--------------
---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
ltlee1
2017-05-27 20:08:34 UTC
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Post by sukiki
The story in link is the early days of manufacturing of products where human
works with their hands is the labor of production. Hand-on is the labor of
gaining of experience and the knowledge of knowing it. But in modern days,
automation increases more output with less labor production to increase
productivity.
Later, labor of production is then expanded into services what is now of
modern days of IT, technology areas like design, research, development,
processes, and material that were small parts of the areas of the
manufacturing processes of the products.
These were actually services of production or production services to support
the production and manufacturing. They were small parts of service areas in
the labor of production at that early days. However, these services gained
foothold to leap ahead to provide for and to support the set up of a
flexible manufacturing processes.
The manufacturing experiences gained from by the labor of production became
a source of experiences for companies to understand and understood better of
their insights of how their products can be improved or how their
manufacturing processes can reduce unit cost of labor production and other
aspects of production services.
All these manufacturing worked and gained that used in the expansion of
services are one of the requisites and recipes of services. They are the
adaptors of changes. Without hand-on working,, horning, knowing and
experience of it, service is nothing, so to speak. Service alone will not
produce anything without manufacturing.
Of course, some jobs are more inspirational than the other in contribution to workers' understanding and innovation. But I don't see the dichotomy between manufacturing and servicing.

In addition, one has to distinguish between advanced economy and developing economy. Advanced economy is only advanced to the extent that it needs less manufacturing workers for every $X of manufacturing output. Hence, advancing in manufacturing and losing manufacturing job go hand and hand. Of course, government policy can break the linkage. But is going back technology wise really preferable? Does assembling really make workers more innovative than service jobs? More important, the US as is does not have enough innovative workers else it should stop the H1B Visa program.

Ultimately, the hard ceiling is the reality that US producing 24.5% of the world's GDP with 4.4% of the world's population is inherently unsustainable. The only question is how to balance losing low end, low income manufacturing jobs and losing high end, high income manufacturing jobs.
Post by sukiki
Post by sukiki
This way of comparison is not healthy for the economy of the country.
Manufacturing contributes to the education of the people too. People learn
and horn their skills from their books they had learned. A look at the
Japanese is good enough to show that manufacturing gradually groay to nws
increasingly in leaps and bounds from looking at the performance of the
actual product made and sold. In fact America has lost so much of their
manufacturing in the past 30 years can be shown by how much Japan and China
had moved ahead in their respective paces.
I don't think manufacturing job and service job are inherently different in
the sense that manufacturing makes better people out of workers.
http://youtu.be/DfGs2Y5WJ14
Post by sukiki
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/800000-factory-jobs-were-lost-to-chinese-imports-but-the-us-is-better-off-researchers-say-2017-05-16
-----------------
marketwatch.com
800,000 factory jobs were lost to Chinese imports, but the U.S. is better
off, researchers say
Andrea Riquier
2-3 minutes
In a time of increased tension over trade and globalization, a research
paper from a trio of St. Louis Fed economists is a reminder that the impact
of trade patterns on the economy isn’t always straightforward.
The amount of goods America imported from China more than doubled between
2000 and 2007, wrote Lorenzo Caliendo, Maximiliano Dvorkin, and Fernando
Parro, even as manufacturing employment tumbled.
While sectors of the economy that are highly exposed to import competition
from China lost more manufacturing jobs than those with less exposure, the
overall impact to the economy was more mixed. About half the lost jobs —
800,000 — can be directly attributed to the “China shock,” the authors
wrote.
But those lost jobs may be somewhat offset by other factors, such as access
to cheaper goods. Overall U.S. “welfare” increased 0.6%, the authors
wrote. That translates to an average gain of $260 in extra spending for
every American consumer for each year for the rest of their lives thanks to
more, cheaper, Chinese imports.
Meanwhile, those sectors of the economy that were insulated from Chinese
competition also profited from access to cheaper input materials from China.
In all, the authors found, manufacturing job losses were offset by gains of
“a similar number” of jobs in services, construction, and wholesale and
retail trade.
...
--------------
---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
sukiki
2017-05-29 10:27:02 UTC
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When we practice we can do more than we think.

You get good at it - very fast and very young knowledge at exactly what you
practice

It is like a mathematical studies has conducted on mathematical skills.

It said " You get good at exactly what you practice, like algebra or
equations, not mathematics in general".
Post by sukiki
The story in link is the early days of manufacturing of products where human
works with their hands is the labor of production. Hand-on is the labor of
gaining of experience and the knowledge of knowing it. But in modern days,
automation increases more output with less labor production to increase
productivity.
Later, labor of production is then expanded into services what is now of
modern days of IT, technology areas like design, research, development,
processes, and material that were small parts of the areas of the
manufacturing processes of the products.
These were actually services of production or production services to support
the production and manufacturing. They were small parts of service areas in
the labor of production at that early days. However, these services gained
foothold to leap ahead to provide for and to support the set up of a
flexible manufacturing processes.
The manufacturing experiences gained from by the labor of production became
a source of experiences for companies to understand and understood better of
their insights of how their products can be improved or how their
manufacturing processes can reduce unit cost of labor production and other
aspects of production services.
All these manufacturing worked and gained that used in the expansion of
services are one of the requisites and recipes of services. They are the
adaptors of changes. Without hand-on working,, horning, knowing and
experience of it, service is nothing, so to speak. Service alone will not
produce anything without manufacturing.
Of course, some jobs are more inspirational than the other in contribution
to workers' understanding and innovation. But I don't see the dichotomy
between manufacturing and servicing.

In addition, one has to distinguish between advanced economy and developing
economy. Advanced economy is only advanced to the extent that it needs less
manufacturing workers for every $X of manufacturing output. Hence, advancing
in manufacturing and losing manufacturing job go hand and hand. Of course,
government policy can break the linkage. But is going back technology wise
really preferable? Does assembling really make workers more innovative than
service jobs? More important, the US as is does not have enough innovative
workers else it should stop the H1B Visa program.

Ultimately, the hard ceiling is the reality that US producing 24.5% of the
world's GDP with 4.4% of the world's population is inherently unsustainable.
The only question is how to balance losing low end, low income manufacturing
jobs and losing high end, high income manufacturing jobs.
Post by sukiki
Post by sukiki
This way of comparison is not healthy for the economy of the country.
Manufacturing contributes to the education of the people too. People learn
and horn their skills from their books they had learned. A look at the
Japanese is good enough to show that manufacturing gradually groay to nws
increasingly in leaps and bounds from looking at the performance of the
actual product made and sold. In fact America has lost so much of their
manufacturing in the past 30 years can be shown by how much Japan and China
had moved ahead in their respective paces.
I don't think manufacturing job and service job are inherently different in
the sense that manufacturing makes better people out of workers.
http://youtu.be/DfGs2Y5WJ14
Post by sukiki
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/800000-factory-jobs-were-lost-to-chinese-imports-but-the-us-is-better-off-researchers-say-2017-05-16
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marketwatch.com
800,000 factory jobs were lost to Chinese imports, but the U.S. is better
off, researchers say
Andrea Riquier
2-3 minutes
In a time of increased tension over trade and globalization, a research
paper from a trio of St. Louis Fed economists is a reminder that the impact
of trade patterns on the economy isn’t always straightforward.
The amount of goods America imported from China more than doubled between
2000 and 2007, wrote Lorenzo Caliendo, Maximiliano Dvorkin, and Fernando
Parro, even as manufacturing employment tumbled.
While sectors of the economy that are highly exposed to import competition
from China lost more manufacturing jobs than those with less exposure, the
overall impact to the economy was more mixed. About half the lost jobs —
800,000 — can be directly attributed to the “China shock,” the authors
wrote.
But those lost jobs may be somewhat offset by other factors, such as access
to cheaper goods. Overall U.S. “welfare” increased 0.6%, the authors
wrote. That translates to an average gain of $260 in extra spending for
every American consumer for each year for the rest of their lives thanks to
more, cheaper, Chinese imports.
Meanwhile, those sectors of the economy that were insulated from Chinese
competition also profited from access to cheaper input materials from China.
In all, the authors found, manufacturing job losses were offset by gains of
“a similar number” of jobs in services, construction, and wholesale and
retail trade.
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