Discussion:
50 Influential Westerners in China
(too old to reply)
p***@yahoo.com
2006-08-04 00:01:12 UTC
Permalink
This is one of the weirdest lists I have ever come across. All I can
conclude from it is that foreigners have actually very little
influence in development of Chinese characteristics. If you diasgree
can you describe the exact contribution of each of the named persons?
Is there any Chinaman who calls himself Rousseau of China for example?


50 foreigners shaping China's modern development
August 3, 2006

http://english.people.com.cn/200608/03/eng20060803_289510.html

Throughout China's time-honored history, the era that began in 1840
was characterized with the biggest, fastest, most fierce and
complicated changes. There were many foreigners that could have
influence upon China in this very period, but generally speaking, 50
of them could doubtlessly best demonstrate the epochal features that
China collided with the world.

Arranged according to the date of birth, the 50 foreigners are:

Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712 - 1778): Swiss-French philosopher, writer,
political theorist and thinker;

George Macartney (1737 - 1806): British diplomat;

Thomas Robert Malthus (1766 - 1834): British political economist and
founder of population theory;

Charles Elliot (1801 - 1875): Chief Superintendent of the trade of
British subjects to China during Opium War;

Hans Andersen (1805 - 1875): Well-known Danish writer of fairy tales;

Charles Darwin (1809 - 1875): Famous British Naturalist;

Karl Marx (1818 - 1883): German philosopher, thinker, social scientist
and political theorist;

Friedrich Engels (1820 - 1895): German philosopher, thinker and
political theorist;

John Glasgow Kerr (1824 - 1901): Follower of Presbyterian Church
(USA);

William Alexander Parsons Martin (1827 - 1916): U.S.' Protestant
missionary to China;

Henrik Ibsen (1828 - 1906): great Norwegian playwright;

Alfred Graf Von Waldersee (1832 - 1904): German army man and Commander
in chief of Eight-Power Allied Force in August 1900;

Hobert Hart (1835 - 1911): General Commissioner of Customs to China
for half century;

Ito Hirobumi (1841 - 1909): Japanese statesman;

Timothy Richard (1845 - 1919): British missionary;

Arthur Henderson Smith (1854 - 1932): American Congregational Church
missionary to China;

Silas Aaron Hardoon (1849 - 1931): Richest Jewish businessman
specialising in real estate through plundering China's wealth before
national liberation in 1949;

Sigmund Freud (1856 - 1939): Austrian originator of psychoanalysis;

Rabindranath Tagore (1861 - 1941): One of India's greatest poet,
writer, artist as well as social activist;

Mcmahon (1862 - 1949): British officer who took part in Simla
Convention in early 20th century with an aim of separating Tibet from
China;

Marie Curie (1876 - 1934): First woman Nobel Prize winner;

Maksim Gorky (1868 - 1936): Great proletarian writer of former Soviet
Union;

Vladimir Lenin (1870 - 1924): Founder of former Soviet Union and
Communism;

John D. Rockefeller, Jr (1874 - 1960): Son of the creator of Standard
Oil and philanthropist;

Stalin (Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili) (1879 - 1953): Great former
Soviet Union leader;

Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955): German-born American physicist;

Leon Trotsky (1879 - 1940): One of the earliest leaders of Russia and
Soviet Union;

Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882 - 1945): 23rd U.S. president;

Okamura Yasuji (1884 - 1966): Commander in chief of Japanese troop
stationed in China;

Mikhail Markovich Borodin (1884 - 1951): Envoy of the Communist Party
of the Soviet Union to China;

Nehru (1889 - 1964): Former chairman of India National Congress;

Norman Bethune (1890 - 1939): Great internationalist from Canada;

Harland Sanders (1890 - 1980): Founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken
(KFC);

Nikita Khrushchev (1894 - 1971): Former premier of the Soviet Union;

Matsusita Kounosuke (1894 - 1989): Founder of Panasonic, world's
renown household appliance in Japan;

Armand Hammer (1898 - 1990): President of America's Occidental
Petroleum

Hirohito (1901 - 1989): Emperor of Japan;

Otto Braun (Li De in Chinese) (1901 - 1974): Military advisor
Communist International of Germany to China;

Ivan V. Arkhipov (1907 - 1998): Vice minister of Metallurgy in former
Soviet Union;

Kim Il Sung (1912 - 1994): Founder of Democratic People's Republic of
Korea (DPRK);

Richard Milhous Nixon (1913 - 1994): One of the most influential
presidents in American history;

Tanaka Kakuei (1918 ¨C 1993): Former Japanese prime minister and most
powerful and aggressive faction leader in the LDP;

Juan Antonio Samaranch (1920 - ): Former IOC president and social
activist from Spain;

Henry Alfred Kissinger (1923 - ): Former U.S. National Security
Advisor and Secretary of State;

Alvin Toffler (1928 - ): American sociologist;

Ken Takakura (1931 - ): Famous Japanese actor;

Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev (1931 - ): President of former Soviet
Union;

Steven Spielberg (1947 - ): Famous Hollywood movie director;

Bill Gates (1955 - ): Founder of software giant Microsoft;

Michael Jordan (1963 - ): American basketball legend.

By People's Daily Online
dick
2006-08-04 00:17:09 UTC
Permalink
I am influenced only by this guy:


Charles Darwin
Post by p***@yahoo.com
This is one of the weirdest lists I have ever come across. All I can
conclude from it is that foreigners have actually very little
influence in development of Chinese characteristics. If you diasgree
can you describe the exact contribution of each of the named persons?
Is there any Chinaman who calls himself Rousseau of China for example?
50 foreigners shaping China's modern development
August 3, 2006
http://english.people.com.cn/200608/03/eng20060803_289510.html
Throughout China's time-honored history, the era that began in 1840
was characterized with the biggest, fastest, most fierce and
complicated change
s. There were many foreigners that could have
Post by p***@yahoo.com
influence upon China in this very period, but generally speaking, 50
of them could doubtlessly best demonstrate the epochal features that
China collided with the world.
Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712 - 1778): Swiss-French philosopher, writer,
political theorist and thinker;
George Macartney (1737 - 1806): British diplomat;
Thomas Robert Malthus (1766 - 1834): British political economist and
founder of population theory;
Charles Elliot (1801 - 1875): Chief Superintendent of the trade of
British subjects to China during Opium War;
Hans Andersen (1805 - 1875): Well-known Danish writer of fairy tales;
Charles Darwin (1809 - 1875): Famous British Naturalist;
Karl Marx (1818 - 1883): German philosopher, thinker, social scientist
and political theorist;
Friedrich Engels (1820 - 1895): German philosopher, thinker and
political theorist;
John Glasgow Kerr (1824 - 1901): Follower of Presbyterian Church
(USA);
William Alexander Parsons Martin (1827 - 1916): U.S.' Protestant
missionary to China;
Henrik Ibsen (1828 - 1906): great Norwegian playwright;
Alfred Graf Von Waldersee (1832 - 1904): German army man and Commander
in chief of Eight-Power Allied Force in August 1900;
Hobert Hart (1835 - 1911): General Commissioner of Customs to China
for half century;
Ito Hirobumi (1841 - 1909): Japanese statesman;
Timothy Richard (1845 - 1919): British missionary;
Arthur Henderson Smith (1854 - 1932): American Congregational Church
missionary to China;
Silas Aaron Hardoon (1849 - 1931): Richest Jewish businessman
specialising in real estate through plundering China's wealth before
national liberation in 1949;
Sigmund Freud (1856 - 1939): Austrian originator of psychoanalysis;
Rabindranath Tagore (1861 - 1941): One of India's greatest poet,
writer, artist as well as social activist;
Mcmahon (1862 - 1949): British officer who took part in Simla
Convention in early 20th century with an aim of separating Tibet from
China;
Marie Curie (1876 - 1934): First woman Nobel Prize winner;
Maksim Gorky (1868 - 1936): Great proletarian writer of former Soviet
Union;
Vladimir Lenin (1870 - 1924): Founder of former Soviet Union and
Communism;
John D. Rockefeller, Jr (1874 - 1960): Son of the creator of Standard
Oil and philanthropist;
Stalin (Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili) (1879 - 1953): Great former
Soviet Union leader;
Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955): German-born American physicist;
Leon Trotsky (1879 - 1940): One of the earliest leaders of Russia and
Soviet Union;
Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882 - 1945): 23rd U.S. president;
Okamura Yasuji (1884 - 1966): Commander in chief of Japanese troop
stationed in China;
Mikhail Markovich Borodin (1884 - 1951): Envoy of the Communist Party
of the Soviet Union to China;
Nehru (1889 - 1964): Former chairman of India National Congress;
Norman Bethune (1890 - 1939): Great internationalist from Canada;
Harland Sanders (1890 - 1980): Founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken
(KFC);
Nikita Khrushchev (1894 - 1971): Former premier of the Soviet Union;
Matsusita Kounosuke (1894 - 1989): Founder of Panasonic, world's
renown household appliance in Japan;
Armand Hammer (1898 - 1990): President of America's Occidental
Petroleum
Hirohito (1901 - 1989): Emperor of Japan;
Otto Braun (Li De in Chinese) (1901 - 1974): Military advisor
Communist International of Germany to China;
Ivan V. Arkhipov (1907 - 1998): Vice minister of Metallurgy in former
Soviet Union;
Kim Il Sung (1912 - 1994): Founder of Democratic People's Republic of
Korea (DPRK);
Richard Milhous Nixon (1913 - 1994): One of the most influential
presidents in American history;
Tanaka Kakuei (1918 ¨C 1993): Former Japanese prime minister and most
powerful and aggressive faction leader in the LDP;
Juan Antonio Samaranch (1920 - ): Former IOC president and social
activist from Spain;
Henry Alfred Kissinger (1923 - ): Former U.S. National Security
Advisor and Secretary of State;
Alvin Toffler (1928 - ): American sociologist;
Ken Takakura (1931 - ): Famous Japanese actor;
Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev (1931 - ): President of former Soviet
Union;
Steven Spielberg (1947 - ): Famous Hollywood movie director;
Bill Gates (1955 - ): Founder of software giant Microsoft;
Michael Jordan (1963 - ): American basketball legend.
By People's Daily Online
RichAsianKid
2006-08-04 01:19:54 UTC
Permalink
List 50 Chinese (in your terms) in foreign 'modern' development.
Post by p***@yahoo.com
This is one of the weirdest lists I have ever come across. All I can
conclude from it is that foreigners have actually very little
influence in development of Chinese characteristics. If you diasgree
can you describe the exact contribution of each of the named persons?
Is there any Chinaman who calls himself Rousseau of China for example?
50 foreigners shaping China's modern development
August 3, 2006
http://english.people.com.cn/200608/03/eng20060803_289510.html
Throughout China's time-honored history, the era that began in 1840
was characterized with the biggest, fastest, most fierce and
complicated changes. There were many foreigners that could have
influence upon China in this very period, but generally speaking, 50
of them could doubtlessly best demonstrate the epochal features that
China collided with the world.
Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712 - 1778): Swiss-French philosopher, writer,
political theorist and thinker;
George Macartney (1737 - 1806): British diplomat;
Thomas Robert Malthus (1766 - 1834): British political economist and
founder of population theory;
Charles Elliot (1801 - 1875): Chief Superintendent of the trade of
British subjects to China during Opium War;
Hans Andersen (1805 - 1875): Well-known Danish writer of fairy tales;
Charles Darwin (1809 - 1875): Famous British Naturalist;
Karl Marx (1818 - 1883): German philosopher, thinker, social scientist
and political theorist;
Friedrich Engels (1820 - 1895): German philosopher, thinker and
political theorist;
John Glasgow Kerr (1824 - 1901): Follower of Presbyterian Church
(USA);
William Alexander Parsons Martin (1827 - 1916): U.S.' Protestant
missionary to China;
Henrik Ibsen (1828 - 1906): great Norwegian playwright;
Alfred Graf Von Waldersee (1832 - 1904): German army man and Commander
in chief of Eight-Power Allied Force in August 1900;
Hobert Hart (1835 - 1911): General Commissioner of Customs to China
for half century;
Ito Hirobumi (1841 - 1909): Japanese statesman;
Timothy Richard (1845 - 1919): British missionary;
Arthur Henderson Smith (1854 - 1932): American Congregational Church
missionary to China;
Silas Aaron Hardoon (1849 - 1931): Richest Jewish businessman
specialising in real estate through plundering China's wealth before
national liberation in 1949;
Sigmund Freud (1856 - 1939): Austrian originator of psychoanalysis;
Rabindranath Tagore (1861 - 1941): One of India's greatest poet,
writer, artist as well as social activist;
Mcmahon (1862 - 1949): British officer who took part in Simla
Convention in early 20th century with an aim of separating Tibet from
China;
Marie Curie (1876 - 1934): First woman Nobel Prize winner;
Maksim Gorky (1868 - 1936): Great proletarian writer of former Soviet
Union;
Vladimir Lenin (1870 - 1924): Founder of former Soviet Union and
Communism;
John D. Rockefeller, Jr (1874 - 1960): Son of the creator of Standard
Oil and philanthropist;
Stalin (Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili) (1879 - 1953): Great former
Soviet Union leader;
Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955): German-born American physicist;
Leon Trotsky (1879 - 1940): One of the earliest leaders of Russia and
Soviet Union;
Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882 - 1945): 23rd U.S. president;
Okamura Yasuji (1884 - 1966): Commander in chief of Japanese troop
stationed in China;
Mikhail Markovich Borodin (1884 - 1951): Envoy of the Communist Party
of the Soviet Union to China;
Nehru (1889 - 1964): Former chairman of India National Congress;
Norman Bethune (1890 - 1939): Great internationalist from Canada;
Harland Sanders (1890 - 1980): Founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken
(KFC);
Nikita Khrushchev (1894 - 1971): Former premier of the Soviet Union;
Matsusita Kounosuke (1894 - 1989): Founder of Panasonic, world's
renown household appliance in Japan;
Armand Hammer (1898 - 1990): President of America's Occidental
Petroleum
Hirohito (1901 - 1989): Emperor of Japan;
Otto Braun (Li De in Chinese) (1901 - 1974): Military advisor
Communist International of Germany to China;
Ivan V. Arkhipov (1907 - 1998): Vice minister of Metallurgy in former
Soviet Union;
Kim Il Sung (1912 - 1994): Founder of Democratic People's Republic of
Korea (DPRK);
Richard Milhous Nixon (1913 - 1994): One of the most influential
presidents in American history;
Tanaka Kakuei (1918 ¨C 1993): Former Japanese prime minister and most
powerful and aggressive faction leader in the LDP;
Juan Antonio Samaranch (1920 - ): Former IOC president and social
activist from Spain;
Henry Alfred Kissinger (1923 - ): Former U.S. National Security
Advisor and Secretary of State;
Alvin Toffler (1928 - ): American sociologist;
Ken Takakura (1931 - ): Famous Japanese actor;
Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev (1931 - ): President of former Soviet
Union;
Steven Spielberg (1947 - ): Famous Hollywood movie director;
Bill Gates (1955 - ): Founder of software giant Microsoft;
Michael Jordan (1963 - ): American basketball legend.
By People's Daily Online
James
2006-08-04 01:50:30 UTC
Permalink
Thousands of ordinary Chinese modernized many parts of the world. In
the US alone, Hawaii would still be just a jungle in the ocean;
California just a dessert; transcontinental railroad a dream. White
labor would never have been able to reclaim Hawaii by hand into
productive cane and pineapple fields; never have been able to make a
garden out of California; and never been able to lay tracks over the
Rockies.

Today thousands of Chinese scientests work in American labs to make
life better for your sorry ass.
J.Venning
2006-08-04 02:52:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@yahoo.com
This is one of the weirdest lists I have ever come across. All I can
conclude from it is that foreigners have actually very little
influence in development of Chinese characteristics. If you diasgree
can you describe the exact contribution of each of the named persons?
Is there any Chinaman who calls himself Rousseau of China for example?
50 foreigners shaping China's modern development
August 3, 2006
http://english.people.com.cn/200608/03/eng20060803_289510.html
Throughout China's time-honored history, the era that began in 1840
was characterized with the biggest, fastest, most fierce and
complicated changes. There were many foreigners that could have
influence upon China in this very period, but generally speaking, 50
of them could doubtlessly best demonstrate the epochal features that
China collided with the world.
Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712 - 1778): Swiss-French philosopher, writer,
political theorist and thinker;
George Macartney (1737 - 1806): British diplomat;
Thomas Robert Malthus (1766 - 1834): British political economist and
founder of population theory;
Charles Elliot (1801 - 1875): Chief Superintendent of the trade of
British subjects to China during Opium War;
Hans Andersen (1805 - 1875): Well-known Danish writer of fairy tales;
Charles Darwin (1809 - 1875): Famous British Naturalist;
Karl Marx (1818 - 1883): German philosopher, thinker, social scientist
and political theorist;
Friedrich Engels (1820 - 1895): German philosopher, thinker and
political theorist;
John Glasgow Kerr (1824 - 1901): Follower of Presbyterian Church
(USA);
William Alexander Parsons Martin (1827 - 1916): U.S.' Protestant
missionary to China;
Henrik Ibsen (1828 - 1906): great Norwegian playwright;
Alfred Graf Von Waldersee (1832 - 1904): German army man and Commander
in chief of Eight-Power Allied Force in August 1900;
Hobert Hart (1835 - 1911): General Commissioner of Customs to China
for half century;
Ito Hirobumi (1841 - 1909): Japanese statesman;
Timothy Richard (1845 - 1919): British missionary;
Arthur Henderson Smith (1854 - 1932): American Congregational Church
missionary to China;
Silas Aaron Hardoon (1849 - 1931): Richest Jewish businessman
specialising in real estate through plundering China's wealth before
national liberation in 1949;
Sigmund Freud (1856 - 1939): Austrian originator of psychoanalysis;
Rabindranath Tagore (1861 - 1941): One of India's greatest poet,
writer, artist as well as social activist;
Mcmahon (1862 - 1949): British officer who took part in Simla
Convention in early 20th century with an aim of separating Tibet from
China;
Marie Curie (1876 - 1934): First woman Nobel Prize winner;
Maksim Gorky (1868 - 1936): Great proletarian writer of former Soviet
Union;
Vladimir Lenin (1870 - 1924): Founder of former Soviet Union and
Communism;
John D. Rockefeller, Jr (1874 - 1960): Son of the creator of Standard
Oil and philanthropist;
Stalin (Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili) (1879 - 1953): Great former
Soviet Union leader;
Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955): German-born American physicist;
Leon Trotsky (1879 - 1940): One of the earliest leaders of Russia and
Soviet Union;
Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882 - 1945): 23rd U.S. president;
Okamura Yasuji (1884 - 1966): Commander in chief of Japanese troop
stationed in China;
Mikhail Markovich Borodin (1884 - 1951): Envoy of the Communist Party
of the Soviet Union to China;
Nehru (1889 - 1964): Former chairman of India National Congress;
Norman Bethune (1890 - 1939): Great internationalist from Canada;
Harland Sanders (1890 - 1980): Founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken
(KFC);
Nikita Khrushchev (1894 - 1971): Former premier of the Soviet Union;
Matsusita Kounosuke (1894 - 1989): Founder of Panasonic, world's
renown household appliance in Japan;
Armand Hammer (1898 - 1990): President of America's Occidental
Petroleum
Hirohito (1901 - 1989): Emperor of Japan;
Otto Braun (Li De in Chinese) (1901 - 1974): Military advisor
Communist International of Germany to China;
Ivan V. Arkhipov (1907 - 1998): Vice minister of Metallurgy in former
Soviet Union;
Kim Il Sung (1912 - 1994): Founder of Democratic People's Republic of
Korea (DPRK);
Richard Milhous Nixon (1913 - 1994): One of the most influential
presidents in American history;
Tanaka Kakuei (1918 ¨C 1993): Former Japanese prime minister and most
powerful and aggressive faction leader in the LDP;
Juan Antonio Samaranch (1920 - ): Former IOC president and social
activist from Spain;
Henry Alfred Kissinger (1923 - ): Former U.S. National Security
Advisor and Secretary of State;
Alvin Toffler (1928 - ): American sociologist;
Ken Takakura (1931 - ): Famous Japanese actor;
Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev (1931 - ): President of former Soviet
Union;
Steven Spielberg (1947 - ): Famous Hollywood movie director;
Bill Gates (1955 - ): Founder of software giant Microsoft;
Michael Jordan (1963 - ): American basketball legend.
By People's Daily Online
I wonder why only some are credited as "famous", "great", and "well.known", but not all. What are the criteria?
J.
r***@yahoo.com
2006-08-04 03:21:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@yahoo.com
This is one of the weirdest lists I have ever come across. All I can
conclude from it is that foreigners have actually very little
influence in development of Chinese characteristics. If you diasgree
can you describe the exact contribution of each of the named persons?
Is there any Chinaman who calls himself Rousseau of China for example?
50 foreigners shaping China's modern development
August 3, 2006
http://english.people.com.cn/200608/03/eng20060803_289510.html
Throughout China's time-honored history, the era that began in 1840
was characterized with the biggest, fastest, most fierce and
complicated changes. There were many foreigners that could have
influence upon China in this very period, but generally speaking, 50
of them could doubtlessly best demonstrate the epochal features that
China collided with the world.
Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712 - 1778): Swiss-French philosopher, writer,
political theorist and thinker;
George Macartney (1737 - 1806): British diplomat;
He was the first British emissary to China sent by King George III in
1793. Emperor Qianlong said "We have never valued ingenious articles,
nor do we have the slightest need of your country's manufactures."
China needed nothing from other countries.
Post by p***@yahoo.com
Thomas Robert Malthus (1766 - 1834): British political economist and
founder of population theory;
Charles Elliot (1801 - 1875): Chief Superintendent of the trade of
British subjects to China during Opium War;
Hans Andersen (1805 - 1875): Well-known Danish writer of fairy tales;
Charles Darwin (1809 - 1875): Famous British Naturalist;
Karl Marx (1818 - 1883): German philosopher, thinker, social scientist
and political theorist;
Friedrich Engels (1820 - 1895): German philosopher, thinker and
political theorist;
John Glasgow Kerr (1824 - 1901): Follower of Presbyterian Church
(USA);
William Alexander Parsons Martin (1827 - 1916): U.S.' Protestant
missionary to China;
Henrik Ibsen (1828 - 1906): great Norwegian playwright;
Alfred Graf Von Waldersee (1832 - 1904): German army man and Commander
in chief of Eight-Power Allied Force in August 1900;
Hobert Hart (1835 - 1911): General Commissioner of Customs to China
for half century;
Ito Hirobumi (1841 - 1909): Japanese statesman;
Timothy Richard (1845 - 1919): British missionary;
Arthur Henderson Smith (1854 - 1932): American Congregational Church
missionary to China;
Silas Aaron Hardoon (1849 - 1931): Richest Jewish businessman
specialising in real estate through plundering China's wealth before
national liberation in 1949;
Sigmund Freud (1856 - 1939): Austrian originator of psychoanalysis;
Rabindranath Tagore (1861 - 1941): One of India's greatest poet,
writer, artist as well as social activist;
Mcmahon (1862 - 1949): British officer who took part in Simla
Convention in early 20th century with an aim of separating Tibet from
China;
Marie Curie (1876 - 1934): First woman Nobel Prize winner;
Maksim Gorky (1868 - 1936): Great proletarian writer of former Soviet
Union;
Vladimir Lenin (1870 - 1924): Founder of former Soviet Union and
Communism;
John D. Rockefeller, Jr (1874 - 1960): Son of the creator of Standard
Oil and philanthropist;
Stalin (Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili) (1879 - 1953): Great former
Soviet Union leader;
Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955): German-born American physicist;
Leon Trotsky (1879 - 1940): One of the earliest leaders of Russia and
Soviet Union;
Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882 - 1945): 23rd U.S. president;
Okamura Yasuji (1884 - 1966): Commander in chief of Japanese troop
stationed in China;
Mikhail Markovich Borodin (1884 - 1951): Envoy of the Communist Party
of the Soviet Union to China;
Nehru (1889 - 1964): Former chairman of India National Congress;
Norman Bethune (1890 - 1939): Great internationalist from Canada;
Harland Sanders (1890 - 1980): Founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken
(KFC);
Nikita Khrushchev (1894 - 1971): Former premier of the Soviet Union;
Matsusita Kounosuke (1894 - 1989): Founder of Panasonic, world's
renown household appliance in Japan;
Armand Hammer (1898 - 1990): President of America's Occidental
Petroleum
Hirohito (1901 - 1989): Emperor of Japan;
Otto Braun (Li De in Chinese) (1901 - 1974): Military advisor
Communist International of Germany to China;
Ivan V. Arkhipov (1907 - 1998): Vice minister of Metallurgy in former
Soviet Union;
Kim Il Sung (1912 - 1994): Founder of Democratic People's Republic of
Korea (DPRK);
Richard Milhous Nixon (1913 - 1994): One of the most influential
presidents in American history;
Tanaka Kakuei (1918 ¨C 1993): Former Japanese prime minister and most
powerful and aggressive faction leader in the LDP;
Juan Antonio Samaranch (1920 - ): Former IOC president and social
activist from Spain;
Henry Alfred Kissinger (1923 - ): Former U.S. National Security
Advisor and Secretary of State;
Alvin Toffler (1928 - ): American sociologist;
Ken Takakura (1931 - ): Famous Japanese actor;
Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev (1931 - ): President of former Soviet
Union;
Steven Spielberg (1947 - ): Famous Hollywood movie director;
Bill Gates (1955 - ): Founder of software giant Microsoft;
Michael Jordan (1963 - ): American basketball legend.
By People's Daily Online
p***@yahoo.com
2006-08-04 04:30:46 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 04 Aug 2006 00:01:12 GMT, ***@yahoo.com wrote:
This is the follow-up article and raises a far more important question
worthy of detailed discussion. I'll opine in a separate post.

In the meantime can each of you make a list of people from the 50
listed that you afre not familiar with? I can't figure out how they
were important to China's development. As Venning says what's the
criteria for the list?

My list is
S G Kerr, Presbyterian Church
W A P Martin, Protestant Missionary
A G vWaldersee, Commander, eight power allied force
I Hirobumi, Japanese statesman
T Richard, British missionary
A H Smith, American Congregation Church
S A Hardoon, rich Jewish businessman
M Kounosuke, founder of Panasonic
I V Arkhipov, Vice Minister of Metallurgy USSR
K Takakura, famous Japanese actor.
Post by p***@yahoo.com
This is one of the weirdest lists I have ever come across. All I can
conclude from it is that foreigners have actually very little
influence in development of Chinese characteristics. If you diasgree
can you describe the exact contribution of each of the named persons?
Is there any Chinaman who calls himself Rousseau of China for example?
50 foreigners shaping China's modern development
August 3, 2006
http://english.people.com.cn/200608/03/eng20060803_289510.html
=====================================================================
How we influence the world
August 4, 2006

http://english.people.com.cn/200608/04/eng20060804_289776.html

On July 28th the Global Times launched a large special report
"1840-2006: 50 foreigners who influenced modern China". On the same
day, the author brought a few copies of the newspaper to a discussion
in Beijing. The gathering is sponsored by the Atlantic Council of the
United States, at which Americans brought a prediction report on 2020
global trends, hoping to hear views from Chinese experts. After
reading the newspaper and listened to the author's introduction,
participants smiled understandingly.

When Americans are pondering what the future world would be like, we
are looking back on the course we have traversed. The most direct
association would be that the Chinese tend to review the past with
content, while Americans like to look into the future with worried
eyes. Of course, things are not that simple.

At the end of the special report we said, "China's rise indicates the
opening of an era in which the country and the external world
influence each other." Speaking of mutual influence, China's looking
forward naturally bears the shadow of the past, and as a latecomer, we
are considering, under others' influence, what can we further bring to
the world. While the United States as No. 1 power may be more
concerned with what it will lose. This is perhaps the difference
between Chinese and Americans in "looking forward".

The American report offered four descriptions on the prospects of
2020. Firstly the "Davos world", that is, sound growth of global
economy led by China and India, which changes the process of
globalization. Secondly, peace under U.S. management; thirdly, a world
ruled by new Islamism, or severe challenge to western "game rules"
posed by radical religious politics. Fourthly, terrorist cycle or
nuclear terror trigger by nuclear proliferation.

Despite the "Davos world" estimate, the report as a whole is imbued
with profound worries. It pointed out a number of uncertainties, among
the top ones being the rise of China and India. As early as two years
ago, as the author remembers, former chairman of the National
Intelligence Council Robert Hutchings mentioned China when answering
questions about the "Mapping the Global Future" 2020 project. The
council believes that, he said, there are two directions for China's
development in 2020: to regress to a closed and aggressive nation or
to grow into an economic superpower mixed with the West.

The American worries come from their past experience. For example,
will the growth of China and India trigger conflicts like rising
powers in history? Therefore, the United States would try every effort
with its power to "shape China". The report also said that the
American role is an important variable in future changes of the world,
which will exert influence on roads to be taken by all states and
non-state organizations. Naturally, the influence of the world's only
superpower cannot be neglected. But for China, the U.S. influence
means a question of what is to change and what is not.

From the Global Times special report, Americans took the majority
among foreigners influencing China after the reform and opening up,
such as Bill Gates, Michael Jordan and Colonel Harland Sanders. These
figures are all products of the U.S. mode that have had far-reaching
impact on China's young generation. In theory, though, we might tend
to learn more from the European mode and are now trying hard to build
a harmonious society. But in reality, something of the U.S.
mode¡ªbeing more market-oriented, encouragement of individual struggle
and competition, pursuit for money and wider rich-poor gap¡ªare
pushing us forward vigorously.

China has no inclination to challenge the current world order. For
China, the question perhaps lies in how to choose the right road under
the current order, and how to make correct decisions when pressured by
the tendency of convergence. Therefore, how we influence the world
turns into a question of how we choose our path of development.

Apparently, the increasing U.S. influence has made it harder for us to
choose and implement our own policies. Apart from China, India and
Brazil, some rising countries of medium and small sizes are facing the
same question. To globalize doesn't mean Americanize, but that is
easier said than done.

How should we remain different under the pressure of tendency to
become the same? This is a severe challenge. The Guardian once
commented that Britain taught the world how to produce in the 19th
century. America taught the world how to spend in the 20th century. In
leading the 21st century, China must teach the world how to achieve
sustainable development, where perhaps lies the key of how China could
influence the world.

This comment by People's Daily senior editor Ding Gang is carried on
the 11th page of the Global Times, July 31, and translated by People's
Daily Online.
J.Venning
2006-08-04 10:09:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@yahoo.com
This is the follow-up article and raises a far more important question
worthy of detailed discussion. I'll opine in a separate post.
In the meantime can each of you make a list of people from the 50
listed that you afre not familiar with? I can't figure out how they
were important to China's development. As Venning says what's the
criteria for the list?
My list is
S G Kerr, Presbyterian Church
W A P Martin, Protestant Missionary
A G vWaldersee, Commander, eight power allied force
I Hirobumi, Japanese statesman
T Richard, British missionary
A H Smith, American Congregation Church
S A Hardoon, rich Jewish businessman
M Kounosuke, founder of Panasonic
I V Arkhipov, Vice Minister of Metallurgy USSR
K Takakura, famous Japanese actor.
A Google search will yield good results as to who these celebrities were and what they did. I think this list was compiled by an individual who has a broad outlook towards Chinese history, and may not coincide with what some others might deem as the 50 worthy to be on that list.

Two years ago, the Danish Cultural Ministry announced the coming of a book entitled "Kulturkanon" - Cultural Canon - that will contain articles about who were most influential in forming the Danish culture. It would be decided by a panel that would bring suggestions and a final decision be made by chosen jury. The national daily newspaper, Berlingske Tidende, regarded the idea as rather high-brow and not in-keeping with the Danish attitude towards Democracy, so they went ahead and did a poll, asking readers to send it who they thought were the most influential Danes and Danish products that shaped the Danish culture throughout the centuries. Their version was published at the beginning of this year, and for a meagre sum of US$4, one can get a hard-cover copy of such a coffee-table book showing who and what the Danish people think that shaped their history and culture. The government version isn't even out yet.
J.

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